The Biodiversity of the Rio Grande Valley Part 4: The Old Man of the Thornscrub

IMG_2515a

Our last day in the Rio Grande Valley was a memorable one.  Carolina, Erin, James, and I spent the morning admiring wintering waterfowl in a shallow Resaca.  During the heat of the afternoon we found ourselves among Lady Fingers and other spined succulents.  In the evening we took a relaxing stroll to see what sort of wildlife might emerge from the dense thornscrub.

There were multiple times during the trip when the conversation between James and I turned to the Texas Tortoise (Gopherus berlandieri).  This iconic South Texas species was high on both of our lists, but thus far the lumbering reptile had evaded us.  But as the sun sank low on our final day, there it was, meandering along a line of brush foraging on just about anything it could fit in its mouth.

IMG_2309

The Texas Tortoise occurs in southern Texas and northeastern Mexico.  Here it can be found in a variety of habitats including desert scrub, Tamaulipan Thornscrub, and subtropical forests, grasslands and scrublands.  They feed on a variety of foods, though seem to prefer soft vegetative matter.  They are famous for gorging themselves on prickly pears.  Though they remain common in many areas, they are listed as Threatened by the State of Texas and are protected accordingly.  They face threats from habitat loss and collection for the pet trade.

IMG_2217

We spent close to an hour watching the antics of our states only “true” tortoise.  Armed with super telephoto lenses, we were able to observe the ancient reptile from a distance, and its behavior didn’t seem altered by our presence.  At one point it managed to get a large branch stuck on its gular projection, and spent several minutes dragging it along until it finally was able to free itself.  It then continued foraging until finally disappearing into dense grass under a canopy of mesquite.  This special encounter was the perfect ending to an incredible trip with great company.

2 thoughts on “The Biodiversity of the Rio Grande Valley Part 4: The Old Man of the Thornscrub

  1. A face only a mother could love. What a great find. And I get all excited about box turtles…I would love to have seen this. keep posting!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s